Now Rest! – 12 Days of Christmas (Posts)

I would say do not read this post until December 25th, but that would defeat the reason for posting it now. I want to wrap this series up by giving you permission to rest.

Take a cue from these animals. Photo By: jenyac
Take a cue from these animals. Photo By: jenyac

I’m not your boss, but I’m still telling you that you need to take it easy for a bit. If you have been around the church for even a short amount of time, you know that there are busy seasons and slower seasons, an ebb and flow to the schedule. However, it often seems more ebb than flow. Your church will most likely see a huge increase in attendance over the next few weeks. You’ll feel the urge to continue the production level that has happened all Christmas as a means of “attracting” them to come back after the new year. Without getting into a “church is not a show” conversation I want to caution you from not taking time to breathe.

Maybe ease into the next series with some single messages (One ofs) that don’t require a large amount of staging. It’s very important to make sure that the many hours put in over the month of December are compensated with some much deserved relax time in January.

I like to use the first part of January to let my guys work on whatever makes them feel good at work. Everyone has that project they wanted to accomplish all last year but couldn’t find the time. Well the clock has started over and it’s best to get it out-of-the-way first before everything else begins piling on.

Also make sure you spread the accolades. Thank the volunteers, thank your staff, and please, don’t forget to thank the spouses who gave up time with their husband or wife so they could be at church. You can never say thank you enough in these situations.

Well I hope your services go off without a bang? Unless you’re using pyro then I hope it’s awesome and know I’m jealous.

Merry Christmas! Happy New Year! Now Rest!

It Takes Two – Preparing for Christmas

Sometimes you learn from other’s experiences, but sometime’s you learn by making the same mistake twice. This year we thought our Christmas eve service would be rather “simplistic” and therefore there was no need for two nights of rehearsal. Typically we would dedicate a night for Tech and Band to work out their various areas, then the second night would be run throughs. This is really how it needs to be, regardless of the production intricacy level. However this year, we thought because the service was on the “easier” side, we could do it in one night. 30 minuets into the rehearsal it became evident that, that was a poor decision – one we won’t make again.

Having time to work through lighting cues, lead guitar parts, and video timing without the pressure of getting the transitions down right or feeling stressed really helps the whole service come together. As an audio guy, I really need this time to tweak and dial in the mix. The lighting guy has free rein to make adjustment and finalize his cues (as long as the band has their music stands lit up.)

So, do yourself a favor and don’t under estimate the time it takes for everyone to just get their minds around their part of the service. Give them adequate time, then when it’s time to actually see it all come together you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

Merry Christmas and Happy Services!